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Brexitology: delving into the books on Brexit

Britain’s vote to leave the EU has produced a wealth of books, which should come as no surprise given the unprecedented challenges and debates it has led to in the UK, the rest of Europe and around the world. Recently published in International Politics Review, ‘Brexitology: delving into the books on Brexit’ covers almost 60 books. It looks at the full range of books published in the run-up to and after the referendum, ending with books published in late 2018.

It offers a way of breaking down the literature into seven manageable topics: how to study Brexit; the history of UK–EU relations; the referendum campaign; explaining the result, Britain’s Brexit; Europe’s Brexit; and Global Brexit. The review identifies some common themes in the books so far published and looks at what the future holds for this topic.’

Full article – Brexitology: Delving into the books on Brexit – can be found here– https://link.springer.com/article/10.1057/s41312-018-0069-1

Books reviewed or referenced in the review—

  • Adonis, A. (2018). Half in, half out: Prime ministers on europe. London: Biteback.
  • Armour, J., & Eidenmüller, H. (Eds.). (2017). Negotiating Brexit. Oxford: Hart Publishing.
  • Armstrong, K. (2017). Brexit time: Leaving the EU—Why, how and when?. Cambridge: CUP.
  • Ashcroft, M., & Culwick, K. (2016). Well, you did ask… why the UK voted to leave the EU. London: Biteback.
  • Bailey, D., & Budd, L. (2017). The political economy of Brexit. Newcastle upon Tyne: Agenda.
  • Banks, A. (2016). The bad boys of Brexit. London: Biteback.
  • Barnett, A. (2017). The lure of greatness: England’s Brexit and America’s Trump. Kansas City: Unbound.
  • Bennett, O. (2016). The Brexit club. London: Biteback.
  • Bickerton, C. (2016). The European Union: A citizens guide. London: Penguin.
  • Booker, C., & North, R. (2005). The great deception: Can the European Union survive?. New York City: Continuum.
  • Buckledee, S. (2018). The language of Brexit: How Britain talked its way out of the European Union. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Cato the Younger. (2017). Guilty men: Brexit edition. London: Biteback.
  • Clarke, H., Goodwin, M., & Whiteley, P. (2017). Brexit: Why Britain voted to leave the European Union. Cambridge: CUP.
  • Clegg, N. (2017). In his how to stop Brexit (and make Britain great again). New York City: Vintage.
  • Connelly, T. (2017). Brexit and Ireland: The dangers, the opportunities, and the inside story of the Irish response. London: Penguin.
  • Diamond, P., Nedergaard, P., & Rosamond’s, B. (2018). The Routledge handbook of the politics of Brexit. Abingdon: Routledge.
  • Dinan, D., Nugent, N., & Paterson’s, E. W. (Eds.). (2017). The European Union in crisis. Basingstoke: Palgrave.
  • Drozdiak, W. (2017). Fractured continent: Europe’s crises and the fate of the west. New York City: W.W. Norton.
  • Dunt, I. (2016 and updated in 2018). Brexit: What the hell happens now? Kingston upon Thames: Canbury Press.
  • Fossum, J. E., & Graver’s, H. P. (2018). Squaring the circle on Brexit: Could the Norway model work?. Bristol: Policy Press.
  • Gamble, A. (2003). Between Europe and America: The future of British politics. Basingstoke: Palgrave.
  • George, S. (1998). An awkward partner: Britain in the European community. Oxford: OUP.
  • Gibbon, G. (2017). His breaking point: The UK referendum on the EU and its aftermath. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
  • Glencross, A. (2016). Why the UK voted for Brexit. Basingstoke: Palgrave.
  • Green, D. A. (2017). Brexit: What everyone needs to know. Oxford: OUP.
  • Hannan, D., & Next, W. (2016). How to get the best from Brexit. London: Head of Zeus.
  • Hassan, G., & Gunson’s, R. (Eds.). (2017). Scotland and the UK after Brexit. A guide to the future. Edinburgh: Luath Press.
  • Hillman, J., & Horlick, G. (Eds.) (2017). Legal Aspects of Brexit: Implications of the United Kingdom’s decision to withdraw from the EU. Washington: Institute of International Economic Law.
  • Humphreys, R. (2018). Beyond the border: The Good Friday agreement and irish unity after Brexit. Kildare: Merrion Press.
  • Kearns, I. (2018). Collapse: Europe after the European Union. London: Biteback.
  • Lyons, G., & Halligan, L. (2017). Their clean Brexit: Why leaving the EU still makes sense—Building a post-Brexit economy for all. London: Biteback.
  • MacShane, D. (2015). Brexit: How Britain will leave Europe. London: IBTauris.
  • MacShane, D. (2016). Brexit: How Britain left Europe. London: IBTauris.
  • MacShane, D. (2017). Brexit, no exit: Why Britain won’t leave Europe. London: IBTauris.
  • McGowan’s, L. (2017). Preparing for Brexit: Actors, negotiators and consequences. Basingstoke: Palgrave.
  • Melchior, A. (2018). Free trade agreements and globalisation: In the shadow of Brexit and Trump. Basingstoke: Palgrave.
  • Menon, A., & Evans, G. (2017). Brexit and British politics. Cambridge: Polity Press.
  • Mindus’s, P. (2017). European citizenship after Brexit: Freedom of movement and rights of residence. Basingstoke: Palgrave.
  • Morphet, J., & Brexit, B. (2017). How to assess the UK’s future. Bristol: Policy Press.
  • Morris, D., & Thomson, J. (2018). Can you Brexit?: Without breaking Britain?. Avening: Spark Furnace.
  • Mount, H., & Madness, S. (2017). How Brexit split the Tories, destroyed Labour and divided the country. London: Biteback.
  • Oliver, T. (Ed.). (2018). Europe’s Brexit: EU Perspectives on Britain’s vote to leave. Newcastle upon Tyne: Agenda.
  • Oliver, T., (2018). Understanding Brexit: A concise introduction. Bristol: Bristol University Press.
  • Oliver, C., & Demons, U. (2016). The inside story of Brexit. London: Hodder & Stoughton.
  • Outhwaite, W. (2017). Brexit: Sociological responses. Cambridge: Anthem Press.
  • Owen, D., & Ludlow, D. (2017). British foreign policy after Brexit. London: Biteback.
  • Peston, R. (2017). WTF. London: Hodder & Stoughton.
  • Rohac, D. (2016). Towards an imperfect Union: A conservative case for the European Union. Lanham: Rowman and Littlefield.
  • Sanders, D., & Houghton, D. P. (2016). Losing an empire, finding a role. Basingstoke: Palgrave.
  • Shipman, T. (2016). All out war: The full story of how Brexit sank Britain’s political class. Glasgow: William Collins.
  • Shipman, T. (2018). Fall out: A year of political mayhem. Glasgow: William Collins.
  • Simms, B. (2016). Britain’s Europe: A thousand years of conflict and cooperation. London: Allen Lane.
  • Smith, J. (2017). The UK’s journey into and out of the EU: Destinations Unknown. Abingdon: Routledge.
  • Staiger, U., & Martill’s, B. (Eds.). (2018). Brexit and beyond: Rethinking the futures of Europe. London: UCL.
  • Tannam, E. (Ed.). (2018). Beyond the Good Friday agreement: In the midst of Brexit. Abingdon: Routledge.
  • Wall, S. (2012). The official history of Britain and the European community, volume II: From rejection to referendum, 1963–1975. Abingdon: Routledge.
  • Welfens, P. (2017). An accidental Brexit: New EU and transatlantic economic perspectives. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.
  • Young, H. (1998). This blessed plot: Britain and Europe from Churchill to Blair. New York: Overlook.
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